Study shows new cardio-pulmonary resuscitation technique increases long-term survival of patients

A study led by Dr. Tom P. Aufderheide, professor of emergency medicine at The Medical College of Wisconsin, shows an alternative method of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation increases long-term survival of patients.

The new technique uses two devices simultaneously to increase circulation. One is a handheld device that attaches with a small suction cup to the patient’s chest. After each compression, the suction cup allows the chest to be lifted up, stimulating blood flow. The second device, called an impedance threshold device, attaches to the patient’s airway using a facial mask or breathing tube. When the chest lifts upward, the impedance threshold device prevents air from rushing into the lungs. That creates a vacuum inside the chest and helps refill the heart after each compression. Researchers found in each compression-decompression cycle, the heart and brain receive nearly three times more blood flow when compared with standard CPR.

A total of 813 standard CPR patients and 840 intervention patients were analyzed in the study. Researchers found 6% of the standards CPR patients survived to hospital discharge with favorable neurologic function. That compares with 9% in the intervention group (improvement of survival chance 53% in intervention group). The same proportions of patients in each group survived to one year.

"Based on our findings, active compression-decompression CPR with augmentation of negative intrathoracic pressure should be considered as an alternative to standard CPR to increase long-term survival after cardiac arrest," said Dr. Aufderheide.

Source: Medical College of Wisconsin

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