DMP1 protein prevents endothelial cells to respond to VEGF

A team from the Metastasis Research Laboratory (GIGA-Cancer/Li??ge University Hospital) has just published, in the prestigious journal BLOOD, their work demonstrating that the DMP1 protein has previously unsuspected anti-angiogenic activities which could be used for the development of new treatments against cancer, but also against diseases in which angiogenesis plays a major role, such as psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis or diabetic retinopathy.

The work shows that DMP1 prevents endothelial cells (the cells which form new blood vessels over the course of angiogenesis) to respond to VEGF, a molecular signal sent by cancer cells to activate the formation of new feeder blood vessels. The presence of DMP1 halts the different stages which lead to the formation of new capillaries: the endothelial cells are placed in a resting non proliferative state.

‘In an in vivo model of angiogenesis linked to tumour development, we have shown that the tumours from cancer cells in which we had beforehand overexpressed DMP1 had a reduced growth combined with very modest vascularisation in comparison with the control tumours,’ points out Doctor Bellahc??ne.

‘These results overall indicate that DMP1 could represent a new anti-angiogenesis molecule whose therapeutic implications would moreover go beyond their use in cancer pathology,’ states Professor Vincent Castronovo, who directs the Metastasis Research Laboratory at the ULg’s GIGA-ResearchUnit.  ’In effect the processes of angiogenesis induced by VEGF also intervene in a significant manner in the development and progression of other pathologies such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and diabetic retinopathy.’

SOURCE Metastasis Research Laboratory

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